Take steps to ensure wolves are protected

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Right now negotiations are being held on an appropriation rider that de-lists the wolf in the western Great Lakes. Not only one federal judge, but the highest appeals court in the nation, with Bush-appointed judges, found that USFWS violated delisting rules for wolves, and now, this rider takes away our legal challenge to keep agencies accountable. We certainly need that more than ever. The Northeast region is a potential wolf habitat, but we have no confirmed wild wolves living here. Restoring wolves to this landscape is really a way to complete and perfect the ecologic order. By resolving the public’s concerns, showing the economic, environmental and social benefits, along with carrying out the purpose of the Endangered Species Act in a strategic and effective manner, the gray wolf could be a success story.But here’s the catch. If wolves are delisted by this rider, it virtually eliminates the chances of natural recovery because of the violent and aggressive wolf-hunting seasons. Wisconsin wolves have the highest probability of getting to New England, but they certainly can’t do it if the population is killed off by trophy hunters.Wolves don’t know state lines, and that’s not how populations are able to recover. Until wolves recolonize suitable habitat nationally, we must stop delisting attempts. Congress shouldn’t be in the business of picking off species to delist. Western Great Lakes wolves are everyone’s wolves, no matter where you live in the United States.Please contact your senator and ask that wolves remain protected.Jacqueline de WittNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationPuccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfectEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Stop blaming flight attendants

first_imgMy daughter is a flight attendant for United with over 20 years experience and has many tales to tell about demanding, disrespectful and rude passengers. I’m sure the cartoon was meant to refer to the recent passenger complaints about their treatment on flights. Perhaps these passengers should spent some time acquainting themselves with the airline and FAA rules about passenger behavior, carry on baggage, and animals. Do what you are asked to do by the attendants — take you seat, have your child sit in his/her assigned seat with restraint attached (not on your lap), baggage in the overhead compartment, no concealing of small dogs or pets in your carry on baggage, etc.The flight attendants are not there to harass you. The attendants are required to undergo extensive training to insure the safety of you and your fellow passengers. If your failure (or ignorance) to obey the rules or attendant instructions cause you to be inconvenienced or removed from the flight, learn a lesson — duh.How smart is it to hide a small animal (dog) in your carry on bag, have it put in the overhead compartment, have the animal suffocate and then blame the airline for causing the animal’s death. Really?Stop blaming the flight attendants who are doing their job to protect you and your fellow passengers. You can always drive, take a train or boat — consider the safety and comfort of your fellow passengers (and also yourself).FRANK LONGORotterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:Car hits garage in Rotterdam Sunday morning; Garage, car burnFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Is your March 17 cartoon on the Opinion Page meant to depict a “witch” or “tramp” as a United Airline flight attendant? If so, it’s highly offensive. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Why are investment funds only investing 5% in property?

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Vital statistics

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New arrivals

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Brussels’ state aid purge threatens £785m grants

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Joint venture Apsley pensions off £34m offices

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Diary of… a rent review surveyor

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Government submits COVID-19 crisis playbook to House

first_imgJokowi said on Tuesday the Perppu would serve as a basis for the government and banking and financial authorities to carry out “extraordinary measures to safeguard people’s health, the national economy and financial system stability”.The government has announced that it will boost state spending by up to Rp 405.1 trillion (US$24.6 billion), pushing the budget deficit up to 5.07 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), to allow the country to afford the fight against COVID-19.Of the extra spending, the government will allocate Rp 75 trillion for healthcare spending, Rp 110 trillion for social protection and Rp 70.1 trillion for tax incentives and credit for enterprises. The biggest chunk, Rp 150 trillion, will be set aside for economic-recovery programs including credit restructuring and financing for small and medium businesses.Read also: Indonesia’s COVID-19 stimulus playbook explained The government expects Indonesia’s economy to grow by 2.3 percent this year under the baseline scenario, which would be the lowest rate since 1999, or to contract by 0.4 percent in the worst-case scenario. Such scenarios have been made in the face of higher risks of a global recession, according to the finance minister.The rupiah is projected to hover between Rp 17,500 and Rp 20,000 per US dollar under the worst-case scenario, a historic low even weaker than the 1998 Asian financial crisis level.House Speaker Puan Maharani said during the same press briefing that the House would support the government’s efforts to safeguard public health and the economy, adding that lawmakers would discuss the Perppu for approval.“We are hoping that by working together at a time like this, we will have a good impact on all Indonesians,” she said. The government has submitted to the House of Representatives a government regulation in lieu of law (Perppu) that allows financial authorities to roll out crisis protocols amid fears the COVID-19 pandemic will hit the economy hard.Perppu No. 1/2020, signed by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo on Tuesday and effective immediately, covers a range of measures that include allowing Bank Indonesia (BI) to throw a lifeline to the state budget through direct government bond purchases and giving policymakers impunity in taking extraordinary measures, as well as allowing the state budget deficit to surpass the legal 3 percent limit.“The spread of COVID-19 has triggered a health and humanitarian crisis. This could potentially lead to an economic crisis and financial crisis,” Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said during a livestreamed press briefing after submitting the regulation on Thursday. “The regulation will serve as a legal background to protect public health and help affected communities, businesses and the economy.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

Yogyakartan charities report police intimidation, monitoring during COVID-19 relief efforts

first_imgAs citizens help low-income community members weather the COVID-19 outbreak, several civil society groups in Yogyakarta have reported police intimidation and excessive monitoring during their relief efforts.A group called Jogja Food Solidarity (SPJ) said the police had been monitoring their distribution of food, facemasks, health supplements and hand sanitizer to low-income informal workers in Yogyakarta.SPJ has opened 11 public kitchens in the city, including on Jl. Ngadiwinatan near Ngayogyakarta Hadiningrat Palace, where volunteers gather to provide free food and other necessities for pedicab drivers, street vendors and sex workers, among others. Ita Fatia Nadia, one of SPJ’s founders, said two police officers had come to their charity event on Jl. Ngadiwinatan last Thursday. “They asked us who initiated the event, who its donors were and where we were distributing the rice boxes. They also took photos of us,” she told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.Ita said activists working at the kitchens did not answer the police officers. The officers soon left the location.However, one of the officers, identified as Parto, returned to the charity event two days later and asked the same questions. “He took pictures of me without my permission. I replied that it violated my rights,” said Ita.She later found out that the officer had not brought a letter of assignment. Ita asserted that no regulation required them to report charity events to the police during the COVID-19 outbreak. Four other police officers came to an SPJ public kitchen in the Ambarketawang Permai housing complex in Gamping, Sleman, on Friday to disperse the volunteers.“They initially thought the event would constitute a mass gathering. After we told them about the charity event, they understood,” said M. Taufiq Firdaus, a volunteer at the kitchen.SPJ was not the only group in Yogyakarta whose charity events were raided by authorities. On Saturday, the police dispersed a meeting to evaluate a charity program held by activists from the Yogyakarta chapter of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi Yogyakarta) in Kotagede.The police argued that the activists had violated a mayoral decree that restricted residents from partaking in mass gatherings during the COVID-19 outbreak. The activists said the meeting had followed prescribed protocols.After negotiating, the Walhi activists were allowed to continue the meeting until 10 p.m. However, at about 8:55, police officers – now accompanied by military personnel and dozens of residents – arrived at the Walhi office to disperse the meeting.”Authorities should stop repressive actions against civil society’s good intentions in the name of COVID-19 prevention,” said Himawan Kurniadi of Walhi Yogyakarta.SPJ’s Ita said she wrote an open letter to President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo on Monday, demanding the President stop repressing such acts of solidarity during the COVID-19 outbreak.Ngampilan Police chief Adj. Comr. Hendro Wahyono, whose jurisdiction covers the location of SPJ’s public kitchens, dismissed the allegations of repression, saying the officers had taken preventive measures to anticipate unwanted occurrences.”In the name of God, we didn’t intimidate anyone. They could have actually asked for our help in distributing aid to society,” Hendro said.Kotagede Police chief Comr. Dwi Tavianto denied that authorities dismissed the meeting at Walhi’s Yogyakarta office. “Residents reported that there was a social gathering at the location. We came to respond to the report.”Yogyakarta has imposed a state of emergency from March 20 to May 29 in an effort to contain the COVID-19 outbreak in the province. As of Wednesday, there were 75 confirmed cases, seven deaths and 75 recoveries in the province. (trn)Topics :last_img read more