Air pollution costs $2.9-T a year – NGO report

first_imgThe report from the Center for Researchon Energy and Clean Air (CREA) and Greenpeace Southeast Asia is the first toassess the global cost of air pollution specifically from burning oil, gas andcoal. Middle-range estimates of the number ofpremature deaths stemming from fossil fuel pollution include 398,000 for theEuropean Union, 230,000 for the United States, 96,000 for Bangladesh, and44,000 for Indonesia. Each year the global economy takes a$350 billion hit from nitrogen dioxide (NO2) – a byproduct of fossil fuelcombustion in vehicles and power plants – and a further $380 billion hit fromozone, according to middle-ground estimates. Air pollution is a focal point of socialdiscontent in some parts of the world, leading some experts to speculate thatit could drive a more rapid drawdown of fossil fuel use. (AFP) PARIS – The global cost of airpollution caused by fossil fuels is $8 billion a day, or roughly 3.3 percent ofthe entire world’s economic output, an environmental research group said onWednesday. Globally, air pollution accounts for 29percent of all deaths and disease from lung cancer, 17 percent from acute lowerrespiratory infection, and a quarter from stroke and heart disease, accordingto the WHO. Living in the New Delhi area of India islike smoking 10 cigarettes a day, earlier research has shown. Particles thrown off by fossil fuelusage account for 4.5 million premature deaths each year around the globe,including 1.8 million in China and a million in India, the researchers found.center_img Among countries taking the biggesteconomic hit each year are China ($900 billion), the United States ($610billion), India ($150 billion), Germany ($140 billion), Japan ($130 billion),Russia ($68 billion) and Britain ($66 billion). “We found that the China Mainland, theUnited States and India bear the highest costs from fossil fuel air pollutionworldwide, an estimated $900 billion, $600 billion and $150 billion per year,respectively,” the report said. The new figure is in line with WorldHealth Organization (WHO) estimates of 4.2 million deaths each year linked toground-level air pollution, mostly from heart disease, stroke, lung cancer andacute respiratory infections in children. The 44-page report breaks down theglobal burden of fossil fuel-driven air pollution – measured in economic costsand premature deaths – by type of pollutant and by country. The global cost for 2018 was $2.9trillion, the report estimated. Globally, air pollution accounts for 29 percent of all deaths and disease from lung cancer, 17 percent from acute lower respiratory infection, and a quarter from stroke and heart disease, according to the World Health Organization. NRDClast_img

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