5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday March 18 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Monday, March 18, 2019:#1) Wilmington Special Education PAC MeetingThe Wilmington Special Education PAC (SEPAC) meets at 6:30pm in the High School Library. Read the agenda HERE.#2) Little Movers At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting Little Movers. Let’s move! Join us for a morning of singing, dancing, and moving around! Ages 1-2. Register HERE.#3) Wilmington Job Networkers MeetingThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting its weekly Job Networkers Meeting at 10am. In Interviewing Fundamentals 1.0, you learned the dos and don’ts of the job interview. Now, put those skills to work in this low count, high impact session! What’s a good interview?  What’s a poor interview? What are the signs that an interview went well? Through video clips, mock interviews, and in-class feedback, we will examine what it takes to be successful in your next job interview! (2 Hours). Register HERE.#4) Girls Who Code At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting its latest Girls Who Code session at 6pm. Learn to code and change the world! Girls Who Code is a national nonprofit working to educate, inspire, and equip middle & high school girls with the skills and resources to pursue opportunities in computing fields. Wilmington is proud to offer a local chapter of this national organization founded with the mission to close the gender gap in the technology field. Grades 6-12. Please contact Technology Librarian Brad McKenna at BMcKenna@Wilmlibrary.org to register.#5) Revive Civility: The Importance Of Being CivilThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting its latest Revive Civility program at 7pm. Watch a 48 minute online lecture given by McGill University Professor John A. Hall as he explores the nature and advantages of civility throughout history and in our world today. The aim is to expand our understanding of civility as related to larger social forces—including revolution, imperialism, capitalism, nationalism, and war—and the ways that such elements limit the potential for civility. Combining wide-ranging historical and comparative evidence with social and moral theory, Hall examines how the nature of civility has fluctuated in the last three centuries, how it became lost, and how it was re-established in the second half of the twentieth century following the two world wars. He also considers why civility is currently breaking down and what can be done to mitigate this threat.  Facilitator Keith West will lead a discussion after the online lecture. The discussion will explore how these concepts effect our daily lives, and what actions we can take as individuals.  We’ll identify and grapple with different experiences and perspectives and reinforce the idea that disagreement need not lead to disrespect. Register HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, August 5, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, July 29, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, June 6, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Sabertoothed cat fossils provide evidence of canines able to puncture a skull

first_imgDetail of the injury of Smilodon populator specimen MCA 2046. B. Detail showing the canine of another Smilodon specimen inserted through the opened injury. C. Detail of the injury of specimen MRFA-PV-0564. Not to scale. Credit: Comptes Rendus Palevol (2019). DOI: 10.1016/j.crpv.2019.02.006 Explore further More information: Nicolás R. Chimento et al. Evidence of intraspecific agonistic interactions in Smilodon populator (Carnivora, Felidae), Comptes Rendus Palevol (2019). DOI: 10.1016/j.crpv.2019.02.006 A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Argentina has found evidence that suggests the canine teeth of the saber-toothed cat were strong enough to puncture the skulls of other members of the same species. In their paper published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, the group describes their study of saber-toothed cat fossils and what they learned from them. Saber-toothed kittens may have been born with thicker bones than other contemporary cats The saber-toothed cat was a formidable predator, of that there is little doubt—the species living in South America, Smilodon populator, grew to weigh 220 to 400 kg, was approximately 120 centimeters long, and had canine teeth that grew to be 28 centimeters in length. They lived during the Late Pleistocene Epoch (from 11,000 to 126,000 years ago). Paleontologists have believed that the canines of the big cats were too thin to puncture bone, but now that theory appears to be under fire. The researchers with this new effort report evidence of what appears to be a hole in an S. populator skull that was made by the canine of another S. populator.The researchers report that they have actually found two S. populator skull fossils with holes in them consistent with a canine piercing. Both of the skulls were found in different parts of what is now Argentina, and both had a single hole between the eyes, but a little farther back—very similar to hole punctures in many modern cats (cheetahs, leopards and jaguars)—such cats, especially males, often get into serious fights, sometimes resulting in the death of one of the combatants. The researchers found that an S. populator canine fit perfectly into the hole in the skull. They tried the same test with other long-toothed animals and were not able to find any with teeth that fit into the holes. They even checked to see if the holes could have been made by a kick from a hoofed animal and were not able to find any that matched. The only fit was another saber-toothed cat canine, which suggests that the holes were made as the cats were fighting over territory, food or a potential mating partner. © 2019 Science X Network Citation: Saber-toothed cat fossils provide evidence of canines able to puncture a skull (2019, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-saber-toothed-cat-fossils-evidence-canines.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more