Flood Watch Extended for Broward and Palm Beach Counties

first_imgA flood watch is now in effect for Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties until 8 p.m. while the flood watch for Mainland Monroe County has been canceled. The soggy weather over South Florida for the last few days has prompted a special weather statement Monday by the National Hurricane Center.The NHC says the disturbance currently over Florida has a 20 percent chance for tropical development over the next two days.Since the weekend, the system has brought widespread showers and thunderstorms across the Sunshine State.The NHC said a weak surface low could form just off the east coast of Florida and move northward toward Georgia and South Carolina on Tuesday and Wednesday.The system is not expected to become a tropical cyclone due to strong upper-level winds, according to the NHC.If it did reach tropical storm strength, the name would be Bertha.In the other South Florida counties, another round of thunderstorms is expected this afternoon, which will likely cause additional flooding.Torrential rainfall may produce flooding of poor drainage areas in urban locations as well as small creeks, streams and canals.Hobe Sound residents are reporting particularly heavy flooding.last_img read more

9 months agoSolskjaer demands players wear Man Utd club suits on matchday

first_imgSolskjaer demands players wear Man Utd club suits on matchdayby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has ordered his players wear their club suits before all games.The Daily Mail says Solskjaer has ordered United’s players to wear their official club suits to all matches as he continues to impose his ethos on the squad.The United stars are still allowed to travel in their club tracksuits, as they did on the train to Watford for Sunday’s 1-0 win over Tottenham.But when Solskjaer and his players arrived at Wembley 24 hours later, they were more formally dressed in suit and tie on the instructions of their caretaker manager.A smarter dress code is just one of the ground rules Solskjaer has borrowed from Sir Alex Ferguson, who was seen at United’s Carrington training ground again on Saturday before the squad left for London.The 45-year-old, who has done the same at Molde, informed the United players of the new regulation on their warm-weather training break last week. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Supreme Court upholds law in crossborder beer case averting trade shakeup

first_imgOTTAWA – The Supreme Court of Canada has affirmed the constitutionality of a New Brunswick law that ensnared a man who brought home a trunkload of beer and liquor from neighbouring Quebec.The unanimous high court decision Thursday effectively preserves the current trade regime, saying provinces have the power to enact laws that restrict commerce if there is another overriding purpose — in this case the desire to control the supply of alcohol within New Brunswick.In October 2012, Gerard Comeau of Tracadie, N.B., drove across the border to Quebec to buy several cases of beer and some liquor from three stores.Comeau was fined $240 and administrative fees under New Brunswick’s Liquor Control Act for being in possession of a large amount of alcohol he had not purchased through his province’s liquor corporation.The trial judge accepted Comeau’s argument the Liquor Control Act provision amounted to a trade barrier that violated Section 121 of the Constitution Act, 1867.The Constitution Act section says, “All articles of the growth, produce, or manufacture of any one of the provinces shall, from and after the union, be admitted free into each of the other provinces.”The New Brunswick attorney general was denied leave to challenge the trial judge’s decision in the provincial Court of Appeal, but the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case, ultimately siding with the province.The ruling underscores a need to renegotiate last year’s interprovincial free-trade agreement, which contains pages of exemptions and creates secretive working groups, but fails to adequately address trade barriers, said Conservative MP John Nater.“Canadians recognize the economic benefits of reducing interprovincial trade barriers,” he said. “It should not be illegal to work or to transport legal products across provincial lines.”Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the interprovincial agreement “a significant step” towards full free trade within Canada.“We know there continue to be issues that will require further discussion with the provinces, but this is something that we’ve made significant progress on, and we will continue to.”Comeau, a 64-year-old retired power linesman, said he wasn’t entirely surprised by the Supreme Court decision.“I’m not really disappointed,” he said in Campbellton, N.B. “I’m not really sad. I got an answer to what the law is.”Comeau said he’s unlikely to continue buying beer in Quebec. “If it’s against the law, it’s against the law.”For Comeau, the case was simply about his right to stock up on cheaper suds. But for provinces and territories, business interests and economists, it was about whether the correct interpretation of the Constitution entailed full economic integration, potentially reshaping the federation.In its reasons, the Supreme Court said New Brunswick’s ability to exercise oversight over liquor supplies in the province “would be undermined if non-corporation liquor could flow freely across borders and out of the garages of bootleggers and home brewers.”The framers of the Constitution agreed that individual provinces needed to relinquish their tariff powers, the court said. In this vein, the historical context supports the view that Section 121 forbids imposition of tariffs — and tariff-like measures — that impose charges on goods crossing provincial boundaries.However, the historical evidence nowhere suggests that provinces would lose their power to legislate for the benefit of their constituents, even if that might affect interprovincial trade.“Section 121 does not impose absolute free trade across Canada,” the decision says.Rather, the historical and legislative context — and underlying constitutional principles — support a flexible view, “one that respects an appropriate balance between federal and provincial powers and allows legislatures room to achieve policy objectives that may have the incidental effect of burdening the passage of goods across provincial boundaries.”The decision confirms the authority of provinces to tax, price and regulate harmful products such as alcohol, tobacco and cannabis, said Rob Cunningham, a policy analyst with the Canadian Cancer Society.“From a public health perspective, the judgment is very positive.”Dan Paszkowski, president of the Canadian Vintners Association, is now hoping for signs of progress on trade liberalization in a forthcoming study being conducted under the terms of the Canadian trade agreement.“We are going to continue to work with that group to develop an interprovincial trade system for Canadian wine.”— With files from Kevin Bissett and Teresa Wright— Follow @JimBronskill on Twitterlast_img read more

No panic from Trudeau government as USimposed NAFTA deadline auto tariff threats

first_imgOTTAWA (NEWS 1130) – Despite no signs of a pending agreement, the Trudeau government doesn’t appear to be worried as the U.S.-imposed NAFTA deadline quickly approaches.“We are not going to be rushed into signing a bad deal,” Andrew Leslie, the Parliamentary Secretary on U.S. relations, says, adding conversations continue between Canadian and U.S. officials and that it remains to be seen what could happen over the weekend.Mexico and the United States announced their own bilateral deal last month, sparking a renewed round of negotiations between Washington and Ottawa to bring to bring Canada into the NAFTA fold.However, Canada’s transport minister is dismissing the October 1st cutoff as just a creation of the U.S.“There is no deadline on this, as far as we are concerned, we want a deal that is good for Canadians, and that’s the bottom line,” Marc Garneau, who also chairs the cabinet committee on U.S.-relations, says.President Donald Trump has threatened auto tariffs if there is no agreement, however, Leslie says Ottawa is prepared if that happens.“One of the options which relies, and will remain open to Canada, is to respond in kind much akin to that which we did for steel and aluminum,” Leslie says.While there is no indication of any formal high level meetings before the Monday deadline, Leslie adds anything is possible.“It means that we’re going to stay calm. We’re going to remain focused in trying to get a good deal for Canadians and protect our jobs and workers. We’re not going to be distracted from that imperative.”He adds if a deal is not struck by the 1st, it will just be the status quo since the current NAFTA will remain in place.Latest U.S. NAFTA deadline not firm but Canada’s window closing, say insidersWith the release of the text of the U.S.-Mexico trade agreement expected any day, the political pressure is mounting on Canada to join a new North American Free Trade Agreement.Analysts and insiders say the latest American-imposed deadline for Canada to join by Monday is not set in stone, and that there is still time for the Liberal government to negotiate with the Trump administration after that.But they caution the window is closing and Canada’s time may be running out.The release of the formal text will come ahead of its formal presentation to U.S. Congress by month’s end, so the lawmakers can approve it by Dec. 1 before the new Mexican government takes power.U.S. President Donald Trump has said he will pursue a trade deal with or without Canada. He has already imposed hefty steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada and Mexico, using a section of U.S. trade law that gives him the authority to do that for national security reasons.The Trudeau government has branded the 232 tariffs illegal and insulting given the close security relationship between Canada and the U.S., including their shared membership in Norad, which defends North American airspace.last_img read more

ED summons Chanda Kochhar husband brotherinlaw

first_imgNew Delhi: The Enforcement Directorate (ED) has issued summons to former ICICI Bank CEO Chanda Kochchar, her husband Deepak Kochchar and brother-in-law Rajiv Kochchar for questionning in a money-laundering case. The agency has summoned Deepak and Rajiv Kochchar on April 30 while the former ICICI Bank chief has been summoned on May 5, sources said. The case is related to the alleged irregularities and corrupt practices in the sanction of a Rs 1,875 crore loan disbursed by ICICI Bank to the Videocon Group during 2009 and 2011. The ED got clues about an illegal transaction running to crores of rupees routed to NuPower. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalIn March, EDA had conducted a series of searches at the residence and office premises of Kochhars as part of its investigations and also questioned Chanda and Deepak Kochhar along with Videocon Group promoter Venugopal Dhoot. Allegedly, Videocon group’s promoter Venugopal Dhoot had invested in the Deepak Kochhar company, NuPower Renewables Ltd through his firm Supreme Energy as quid-pro-quo for loans cleared by the ICICI Bank under Chanda Kochhar. Out of the Rs 40,000 crore loan to the Videocon group, Rs 3,250 crore was given by ICICI Bank and a large portion of the loan by ICICI was unpaid at the end of 2017. The bank proceeded to declare the Rs 2,810 crore of unpaid loan as non-performing asset.last_img read more

The Bulls Made The Right Decision But The Wrong Trade

The rebuild is already off to an odd start, though. Beyond LaVine’s injury risk, the Bulls are also getting him at a time when the 22-year-old is on the cusp of landing what figures to be a big payday. (In fact, they’ll be forced to hammer out an extension this summer — perhaps well north of $20 million a year, without seeing him play meaningful basketball since the injury — or else risk another team throwing a bigger offer at him as a restricted free agent and forcing Chicago to match.) There’s a decent chance his next deal briefly outpaces Butler’s annual salary of almost $19 million, one of the best bargains in the NBA, since Butler is locked in until at least 2019.In other words: The rebuild will require the Bulls to shell out considerable salary to a young player who hasn’t proven to be a sure thing yet. And with Dunn, one of the older rookies in last year’s draft, they’ll be hoping that last season was just an aberration for him.Part of what makes the swap so disappointing for the Bulls is the fact that they were engaged in draft-day conversations about the same players last year, before talks eventually broke off. The Bulls have more information now — that LaVine showed vast improvement on offense before tearing his ACL, that Dunn’s college success probably won’t translate right away, and that Butler is truly an elite, All-NBA talent — yet the Bulls pulled the trigger on a package that should be even less attractive to them now than it was then.From Minnesota’s vantage point, it’s easy to imagine how Butler can immediately come in and change things for the youthful Timberwolves, who were a great first-half team but blew more double-digit leads in second halves than any other team in the NBA. The 27-year-old was fantastic when it counted this past season, posting a 44.5 player-efficiency rating in clutch scenarios,4Meaning moments when a game is within 5 points during the final five minutes of of action. second-best in the NBA behind only Russell Westbrook, according to ESPN Stats & Information Group. His presence also boosts a defense that was fifth-worst in the league last season, in part because Andrew Wiggins still really struggles on that end, even though he has wingspan and athleticism of a stopper. It wouldn’t be surprising to hear some put Minnesota on a short list of clubs that could potentially beat Golden State a couple of years from now if they continue to build out that roster.There are a handful of things that figure to work out nicely for the Bulls as a result of this trade, too. LaVine showed considerable improvement as a shooter last season, something Chicago can use given the team’s abysmal numbers from outside. And his ability to get up and down the floor should allow coach Fred Hoiberg play the uptempo style he’s wanted to use since joining the Bulls more than two years ago. (This becomes even more true if Dwyane Wade, who recently told the team that he was opting into the last year of his deal for $24 million, decides it’s best to negotiate a buyout with the club.)With Dunn, even if his offense doesn’t improve a ton, the team will at least have a very good, capable defender at the guard spot. The ex-Providence standout is a pest and uses his length to disrupt the passing lanes. He ranked fourth in the NBA with 4.6 deflections per 36 minutes.5Among those who played 1,000 minutes or more this past season.All things considered, though, there’s a reason that the Bulls are getting failing grades for this move. No one is knocking the idea of conceding that a rebuild was necessary. That much was obvious. But given that Butler had more time left on his deal, the team’s hand wasn’t forced to do something this very moment. Chicago easily could’ve waited until the trade deadline to try to sell the swingman off to a desperate contender.Either way, the Bulls should have been able to get more than damaged, or diminished, goods in exchange for their franchise player. CHICAGO — NBA franchises fail all the time in trying to construct a team. On Thursday, the Bulls illustrated that it’s possible to botch the dismantling of one.Anyone who watched the Bulls over the past two years could see that this team — whether it managed to sneak into the playoffs or not — was on a treadmill of mediocrity. And that was the case despite having an All-NBA talent like swingman Jimmy Butler. The reset button needed to be hit.That happened Thursday when the team traded Butler to the Minnesota Timberwolves for Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn and the No. 7 draft pick, Lauri Markkanen. Without context, acquiring young players like LaVine (who averaged 19 points a game last season), Dunn (the highly sought-after No. 5 pick from last June) and 7-foot sharpshooter Markkanen would be a decent return for a player of Butler’s caliber. But, like always, the devil is in the details here. LaVine missed the final 32 games of the season after tearing his ACL — an injury the Bulls are all too familiar with — while Dunn had an incredibly rough rookie season, one in which he not only posted the lowest true-shooting percentage among first-year players, but the worst true-shooting mark of any player, period.1Of players who logged at least 1,000 minutes last season.And while it’s too soon to truly criticize anything about the Markkanen acquisition, it was shocking that Chicago felt the need to send its No. 16 pick2One it ended up using on Justin Patton, to send to Minnesota. to the Wolves to complete this trade, given how much better Butler was than everyone else involved. The Bulls shouldn’t have needed to send anything else to sweeten the deal.3Curiously, Chicago has a bit of a bad habit of sending along picks in situations where it shouldn’t have to. For instance, consider the Bulls’ trade-deadline deal in which they unloaded Taj Gibson and Doug McDermott, the two best players in that transaction, yet found themselves giving up a second-round pick to complete the swap. Yet the team says this was the best offer they had for Butler, by far, and that the move gave Chicago an opportunity to move from the center of the totem pole all the way near the bottom, where it will be easier to build through the draft in the future.“Jimmy has improved as an individual maybe as much as any guy we’ve been around,” said Bulls Executive Vice President John Paxson of Butler, who went from averaging 2.6 points as a rookie to nearly 24 points in his sixth year. “Minnesota is obviously getting a heck of a player. He’s going to be missed. But with that said, what we’ve done is set a direction. We’ve gone to the playoffs, but not at a level that we’ve wanted to. And in this league, success is not determined that way. And we’ve decided to make the change and rebuild this roster.”VIDEO: Breaking down the Butler trade read more

Buckeye divers wrap up trials

For five Ohio State divers, The week of Feb. 1 through 8 was full of trials.OSU’s men and women divers competed in the 2010 USA Diving Winter Nationals and World Cup Team Trials starting Feb. 1 in the McCorkle Aquatic Pavilion.From preliminary to semifinal to final events, the Buckeyes were constantly performing and refocusing for multiple events.USA Diving spokeswoman Jennifer Lowery said there are 10 titles at stake from the events. For the FINA World Cup Team, they will take the top two finishers from the individual 3-meter and individual 10-meter events, Lowery said.“So the winner is the national champion, and gets a spot on the World Cup Team, and second place gets an alternate,” Lowery said. “We’ll have a synchro trial in April to pick the two from those two events.”OSU senior Weston Wieser started off the week of trials in the men’s 1-meter preliminaries on Feb. 1. Wieser placed second with a 366.5.On Feb. 2, Wieser placed second in the men’s 3-meter preliminaries, but was eliminated in the quarterfinals on Feb. 4, placing 23rd.His last event, men’s 10-meter platform, started with quarterfinals Feb. 5 immediately followed by semifinals. Wieser came in fifth with a score of 418.80, just less than 15 points behind the fourth place.In the final round, Wieser’s first and final dive of the six rounds earned dive scores of 86.40. He came in fifth against competition like Olympic medalist David Boudia, who swept first place with just more than 116 points.OSU senior Ryan Jefferson also had a good showing, placing sixth in the preliminary round of men’s 3-meter springboard. The Wisconsin native placed ninth in the semifinals and finished ninth in finals with an 815.10.Feb. 4 marked the start of the week for OSU diver Katie Bell, who placed second in both women’s 10-meter platform preliminary/quarterfinals and semifinals. Bell, who won a U.S. national championship in August on the 10-meter platform, dove in two events on Feb. 6, placing third in the women’s 10-meter platform finals with an overall score of 670.85.Bell missed the spot on the FINA World Cup Team by 6.5 points, but qualifies for the U.S. Grand Prix Team that will compete May 6 through 9 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., against divers from 20 nations.In the women’s 10-meter synchro final later that day, Bell did not place among the top two qualifying spots. The synchro event is similar to the individual dive, but two divers perform the same dive together and are judged on their technique and synchronization.Joining Bell in the women’s 10-meter platform was junior Kristen Asman, who went into finals ranked sixth from her semifinal dive on Feb. 4. The Columbus native scored a 529.55 with an average score of 49.81 to take ninth place in finals.Rounding it out for the Buckeyes was third-year Bianca Alvarez.Alvarez competed in the women’s 3-meter springboard preliminary/quarterfinals, semifinals and finals. She placed seventh in the finals, just less than 78 points shy of second place after a failed first dive.The Miami, Fla., native paired up with 17-year-old Loren Figueroa. This was the first time the two have competed as a pair in 3-meter synchro event.“We don’t have a lot of our skills the same; a lot of our techniques might be a little bit different,” Alvarez said after her 3-meter synchro event Sunday. So basically that’s one thing we need to work on, just trying to get together more.”Alvarez said because her partner doesn’t live in Columbus, Figueroa will have to fly to Columbus to practice with Alvarez to prepare for future competitions together.Paired together at a synchronized diving camp attracting the top divers from across the country, Alvarez said those that run the camp make the evaluation of which two divers look best together.“They told us that we did [look the best together], so we stuck with that,” Alvarez said. “We just tried it out here at nationals.”Lowery said Sunday that the experience overall was great watching the OSU divers make it all the way to the finals.“I think Ohio State did really well. I think everyone made finals on their event. There was a really good representation: top five, top six,” Lowery said. “Katie Bell was third, Wes [Wieser] just got fifth. A really strong showing by the Buckeyes.” read more