One Book Nova Scotia Launches Reveals Author

first_imgThe One Book Nova Scotia project wants to get Nova Scotians reading the same book and sharing the same story. Today, Sept. 21, that book was revealed to be Twenty-Six, by Nova Scotian author Leo McKay Jr. MLA Pam Birdsall, on behalf of Leonard Preyra, Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage, helped launch the new provincewide reading campaign for adults at the Keshen Goodman Public Library in Halifax. “It’s about community, bringing people together, providing a common subject for discussion,” said Ms. Birdsall. “The One Book Nova Scotia initiative will encourage a love of reading and life-long learning for people of all ages and foster a stronger community for years to come.” Published in 2003, Leo McKay Jr’s Twenty-Six is a work of fiction about a family living in small town Nova Scotia whose lives are changed forever after a mining accident claims the lives of twenty-six men. The One Book Nova Scotia project was organized by Libraries Nova Scotia, a group of library representatives from public, university and community college libraries, as well as the Nova Scotia Provincial Library division of the Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage and the Writers’ Federation of Nova Scotia. “In selecting the book, the criteria included a living Canadian author with a conversation generating story that could appeal to a wide range of adults with varying literary levels and life experiences,” said Frances Newman, chair, One Book Nova Scotia steering committee. Other considerations included the book be in print, available in a variety of formats and not be a previous bestseller. The One Book movement began in 1998 at the Seattle Public Library and spread to other communities in North America. This is its first year in Nova Scotia. The program will run until Nov. 9; during this time Mr. McKay will hold readings at libraries across the province. Nova Scotians can also participate in bookclub discussions and get involved through Facebook and Twitter. For more information on the program visit 1bns.ca .last_img read more

BC First Nations appeal to United Nations to help stop LNG plant

B.C. First Nations appeal to United Nations to help stop LNG plant NEW YORK CITY, N.Y. – First Nations leaders from northwestern British Columbia have taken their battle against a liquefied natural gas project to the United Nations.The group was scheduled to travel to New York Thursday to seek UN support for a demand that the Canadian government reject the LNG project proposed just south of Prince Rupert.Opponents say the $36-billion Pacific Northwest plant, slated for Lelu Island at the mouth of the Skeena River, threatens wild salmon habitat on the second largest salmon bearing river in B.C.Hereditary Chief of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, John Ridsdale, says Prime Minister Justin Trudeau earned cheers at a recent UN forum by pledging to protect the rights of indigenous people.But Ridsdale says the LNG development, backed by Malaysia’s state oil company, Petronas, endangers that pledge and is “the wrong project in the wrong place at the wrong time.”Environment Minister Catherine McKenna has said a cabinet decision on an environmental assessment covering the Pacific Northwest plant should be made by late June.The B.C. government believes the project could generate more than 18,000 jobs and produce billions in revenue.“We will not sell our salmon future for any price,” Murray Smith, one of the House Leaders of the Gitwilgyoots Tribe, says in a news release.The Gitwilgyoots Tribe is one of the Nine Allied Tribes of Lax Kw’alaams opposed to the LNG plant.“We stand against this project for all the peoples of this world. We don’t want money, we want justice. We invite you to join our battle, to add your voices to our struggle to protect the only home we have ever had,” he says in the release.Fellow Gitwilgyoots member Christine Smith-Martin says the group is respectfully asking the federal government to do the right thing, and wants to the world to bear witness to its concerns. by The Canadian Press Posted May 12, 2016 9:32 am MDT Last Updated May 12, 2016 at 10:20 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more