‘I wanted to keep it interesting’ – Morgan on tea-drinking celebration

first_imgU.S. striker Alex Morgan was coy when asked about her tea-drinking celebration against England, simply saying that she “wanted to keep it interesting.”The American forward scored what turned out to be the game-winning goal in a 2-1 victory over England in the World Cup semifinal, nodding home Lindsey Horan’s cross in the 31st minute.After scoring, Morgan celebrated by pretending to drink a cup of tea, which was branded as “disrespectful” by some observers. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Morgan indicated that the celebration was inspired by one of her teammates, who herself produced an instantly iconic celebration in the quarterfinal against France by lofting her arms skyward after scoring both of her goals. “I wanted to keep it interesting,” Morgan said after the game. “I know Megan Rapinoe has the best celebrations so I had to try to step up this game.”Morgan did step up on Tuesday in Lyon, scoring her sixth goal of the tournament to draw level with England’s Ellen White in the race for the Golden Boot.Her goal put the U.S. in the final of a tournament where they have been followed by controversy.From the outcry over their celebrations against Thailand to Rapinoe’s feud with Donald Trump to Phil Neville’s protestations against U.S. staff scouting out England’s team hotel, there has always been a non-soccer story surrounding the USWNT in France.Morgan suggested that her celebration may have been inspired by those persistent discussions, saying her team is staying cool among all the hysteria.“We have a lot of noise around this team and it doesn’t affect this team, and so I think we’re just drinking the tea,” Morgan said.Morgan Tea England USWNTThe American striker indicated that Rapinoe may have played a part in planning the celebration, a charge that Rapinoe didn’t exactly deny. “I’m always in the mix on things but we can’t give away all the trade secrets,” Rapinoe said with a smile. The U.S. will take on either Sweden or the Netherlands in the final on Sunday as they look to make it back to back World Cup titles. Having gone through a gauntlet of France and England in the semifinal, Morgan says her team is now stronger for having come out the other side.“This team has had so much thrown at us and I feel like we didn’t take the easy route to the final this tournament,” Morgan said. “And that’s the tea.”last_img read more

Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith says individual changes can key Big

As the Big Ten expands to 14 teams with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland, Gene Smith thinks improvement across the conference will come down to individual schools making changes.The Ohio State vice president and athletic director said in a July 7 interview with The Lantern the Big Ten is already doing its part to boost competition levels.“The conferences is doing its job with the national exposure that we get to the Big Ten Network and all the other contracts,” Smith said.He added this income gives the coaches and programs at Big Ten schools the resources to recruit highly-rated athletes and improve their own teams. Smith also said improving the conference’s national standing has to go beyond recruiting.One step towards improving schedules could be eliminating games against Football Championship Subdivision opponents –– a practice OSU has steered away from over the past few years. Last year marked the first time the Buckeyes played an FCS opponent since they took on Youngstown State in 2008. That game ended with a 43-0 OSU victory, while the Buckeyes defeated Florida A&M 76-0 in September.According to a February 2013 article by ESPN, Wisconsin athletic director Barry Alvarez said the Big Ten agreed to stop scheduling FCS opponents across the board.“The non-conference schedule in our league is ridiculous,” Alvaraz said on a Madison, Wis., radio show, according to the article. “It’s not very appealing.”The article said the ban could start by the 2016 season.Smith said the Big Ten’s new scheduling guidelines are hard to commit to for schools, but it is important to play major opponents.“It’s very difficult to do, to say that you’re not going to play a (FCS) team,” he said. “That you’re going to play one major, at least, in your non-conferences schedule.”Smith added the drive to schedule opponents who are easier on paper stems from the system of needing just six wins to qualify for a bowl game. He said he has never been a fan of that system and thinks it leads to teams trying to pad their schedules with less challenging non-conference games.At the end of the day, Smith said it is still up to the individual schools to figure out how they can put their best product on the field year in and year out.“As an institution, what do you do with your football coach to help him recruit the best talent to where you are so that you can get better?” he asked.While there have been knocks on OSU’s strength of schedule throughout the years, it has been rare to see the Buckeyes not schedule at least one major non-conference opponent. Since the beginning of the decade, OSU has taken on the University of Miami (Fla.) and the University of California twice, and the team is set to take on Virginia Tech this season and in 2015.While Miami and California were not at their peak performance levels during those seasons, Smith said OSU’s non-conference schedule is set to ramp up beyond the next two seasons. Between 2016 and 2023, the Buckeyes are currently scheduled for home-and-home matchups with Oklahoma, North Carolina, Texas Christian University, Oregon and Texas.Scheduling better teams is a start, but Smith said there is still one more ingredient in the recipe for improving the conference’s reputation.“I think our problem in the Big Ten is we need to go beat people,” Smith said. “At the end of the day, you’ve got to go beat non-conference people, so that’s something we have to do better.”Beyond scheduling high-powered opponents, OSU has made changes to Ohio Stadium to boost recruiting as well as the fan experience at Buckeye games. Those changes include a new turf field, additional seats in the south stands and permanent lights to help the scheduling of night games.Smith said these additions are part of a plan for the future but can help recruiting off the bat, especially as OSU’s schedule begins to include more prime-time starts.“Recruiting is off the chain, we know that,” Smith said of the atmosphere at night games. “Because it’s a cool environment.”He also said there is a novelty to night games, so the school has to be sure not to schedule too many or too few.In a May interview, associate athletic director for facilities operations Don Patko said the stadium project had a deadline set for Aug. 14. As of July 7, Smith said the project was still on schedule and within the initial budget of $8.9 million.The OSU football team is scheduled to begin its season Aug. 30 against Navy in Baltimore, Md., at noon. The first game of 2014 at Ohio Stadium is scheduled for Sept. 6, when OSU takes on Virginia Tech at 8 p.m. read more